Northridge Farm Compost Trip

We took a trip to Northridge Farm composting facility yesterday to pick up a load of nutrient rich compost for the campus plots this year. We took ourselves on a mini tour of the facility and it was an eye opening (and nostril burning) experience to see the different steps and stages that go into making this black gold. Northridge Farm is where Wolfville’s household compost is taken to be transformed into rich, garden enhancing greatness.

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The first step, as you can see in the photo above, is to bring in the raw compost which is sorted quickly for non organic products such as plastic bags and other garbage. Unfortunately, as we saw throughout the process, a lot of people have not yet gotten a handle on what to put in the compost, recycling or garbage. Look at all that plastic! Remember, it may not seem like it matters if one person has a little mix up with the sorting process at home, but when a whole municipality makes mistakes, it adds up to a whole lot of plastic where it shouldn’t be.

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The compost is then transferred into stalls which are turned periodically to provide oxygen and encourage productive decomposition.

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The compost then rotates through two other buildings which represent different stages of decomposition before it is laid out on the field to mature. Because citizens still struggle with sorting waste, compost has to be sorted, sifted and screened numerous times before it can be used or sold. Even the end product, which is beautiful rich dark soil, has small bits of plastic which are impossible to remove, regardless of the screening process. I know all you members of the Acadia Community Farm community do a fabulous job of sorting your waste, but tell your friends, family and neighbours! There’s too much plastic going into our compost!

Fun Fact: most “compostable” plastic bags end up in the landfill because they take too long to decompose, and don’t decompose unless under the perfect conditions for their design.

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3 Responses to “Northridge Farm Compost Trip”


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  3. 3 Jodie Noiles May 15, 2015 at 9:16 am

    Great information Myah. For those who like the convenience of compostable bags, look for products that are certified by the Biodegradable Products Institute, which are accepted in our local organics stream. http://www.bpiworld.org


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About

The Acadia Community Farm began in the spring of 2008 with the vision of providing local, organic produce to the dining hall at Acadia University, while also serving as a community garden. The Farm has grown to become an educational community centre for the exchange of knowledge surrounding gardening, food, and sustainable agriculture. Explore the site to find out more or stop by the Farm for a visit!

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