The Weedless Garden Award

The Acadia Community Farm would like to present its first award of the season to plot #2. Each day when I make my way down the farm I am in awe of each and every individual plot. All of the  gardeners have a different approach to planting, design, and the maintenance of their garden. Plot #2 stood out the most as it seemed to never have a single weed growing in the garden while all of the vegetable plants were thriving! For this reason I am pleased to announce that plot #2 will receive the “Weedless Garden” award. Here is a little bit about the gardner of plot #2 and their secret to a weedless garden.

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  • How long have you been gardening?

For about 20 years – veggies, that is

  • What got you interested in gardening?

I particularly enjoy the taste and smell of veggies out of the garden — they just seem so much better than what you buy in the store.  Maybe more importantly, gardening gives you time to think, and to feel productive; it’s a fairly solitary activity and you get to see the fruit (and vegetables) of your labour.

  • What plants do you like to grow?

Beans and tomatoes; I’ve tried to grow peas as well, but seem to have no luck with them.  This year I’m trying beets for the first time.

  • What is your secret to controlling the weeds in your garden?

Well it helps to be a little OCD;  I try to get them as soon as I can distinguish weeds from the veggies I’m growing, and I try to clear a few weeds several times a week, especially after a rain.

  • Any advice you have for a successful garden.

Be patient, and just enjoy it!

Let the Season Begin!

Things are starting to spring to life down at the farm!

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Bright swiss chard planted in our cold frame by the Sustainable Food Systems class graciously donated by Sarah Pittoello!

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Leeks (left) and Potatoes (right) planted by the Sustainable Food Systems class are also taking off down at the farm.

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The Radish seeds that were planted two weeks ago are starting break ground! They are the first of all the planted seeds to show signs of life. We are still waiting on beans, beets, carrots, cabbage, and lettuce to sprout.

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The tomato transplants are starting to settle into their new homes with a nice blanket of straw to help hold the water in the soil on those hot valley summer days.

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Further down the farm there is a lot of progress being made with the community members personal plots! I encourage anyone who is interested, to explore the Acadia Community Farm. You do not need to have a plot to visit the farm, all are welcome!

If you are interested in getting a plot to grow your own food reach out to sarah@acadiafarm.org.

 

Gardening 101 Workshop! Wednesday, June 22nd

The Acadia Community Farm is pleased to present its first workshop of the year! Gardening 101 with Av Singh, Ph. D., P. Ag. This workshop aims to equip you with all of the knowledge, skills, and confidence needed to start your very own vegetable garden or improve upon your existing garden.

Best of all it’s FREE and open to ANYONE who is interested.

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Date: Wednesday, June 22nd.

Time: 6:30pm – 8:00pm

Location: Acadia Community Farm (behind the Athletic Center)

Rain Date: Wednesday, June 29th. 6:30pm – 8:00pm, Acadia Community Farm.

Please RSVP by emailing sarah@acadiafarm.org or calling 585-1311.

 

 

Center for Small Farms Upcoming Events!

Join the Center for Small Farms in their two upcoming events The Market Gardener’s ToolkitThe Market Gardner's Toolkit picture

 and Deconstructing Dinner

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For more details please visit http://www.centreforsmallfarms.ca

Compost, Mulch, and Straw at the Farm

Just a quick reminder to all plot holders that the compost, mulch and straw located at the beginning of the farm is not for individual plot holder use. Thank you for your cooperation!

Wood ash for gardens: advice from Oregon State University

Winter is finally over and for those with a pile of wood ash at home you might be wondering if you can use it in your garden. Yes you can according to the Oregon State University Extension Service. Wood ash can be useful in gardens, in your compost pile or as a pest repellent, but apply carefully. Read more here: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/gardening/wood-ash-can-be-useful-yard-if-used-caution

Spring Orientation Meeting June 1st

The spring orientation meeting for new and returning gardeners will be held on Wednesday June 1st at 7pm in the Hall of Fame Room, Acadia Athletic Complex. Contact sarah@acadiafarm.org for more information. See you then!


About

The Acadia Community Farm began in the spring of 2008 with the vision of providing local, organic produce to the dining hall at Acadia University, while also serving as a community garden. The Farm has grown to become an educational community centre for the exchange of knowledge surrounding gardening, food, and sustainable agriculture. Explore the site to find out more or stop by the Farm for a visit!

Contact

Want to get involved? Contact info@acadiafarm.org

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